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International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22(2): 128-134

Published online June 25, 2022

https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

© The Korean Institute of Intelligent Systems

Security-constrained Economic Dispatch (SCED) Considering Load Level Uncertainty

BenJeMar-Hope Flores1 and Hwachang Song2

1Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea
2Department of Smart Energy System Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence to :
Hwachang Song (hcsong@seoultech.ac.kr)

Received: September 24, 2021; Revised: September 24, 2021; Accepted: January 10, 2022

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

In power system operation, security-constrained economic dispatch (SCED) is used to provide a reference point for the next time period for each dispatchable generator, and load forecasting needs to be involved in the SCED procedure. In real-time operation, forecasting errors and the nonlinearity of the load change might cause undesirable dispatch patterns in terms of system security. This study presents an SCED that considers the uncertainty of the system load level. For this purpose, a fuzzy model was employed to express the uncertainty in the load level change, and a practical two-stage SCED solution method was adopted. In addition, to resolve the difficulty in determining the reference generation pattern from solutions using this model, a procedure is required to determine the secure upper and lower limits for the dispatchable generators as the final SCED outcome. The numerical results were obtained using a 43-bus test system to test the feasibility of the proposed method.

Keywords: Economic dispatch, Load level, Generation pattern, Security constraints, Uncertainty model

This work was supported by the Seoul National University of Science and Technology.

No potential conflicts of interest relevant to this article were reported.

BenJeMar-Hope Flores received his degree in electrical engineering from the University of the Philippines, Diliman in 2011. He finished his M.S. degree in Seoul National University of Science and Technology in 2014 and is currently a Ph.D. candidate in the same university. He is a registered electrical engineer and has also served as a senior science research specialist for the Department of Science and Technology in the Philippines. His research interests include power system planning and operation, grid resilience, and reliability.

E-mail: floresbenjie@seoultech.ac.kr


Hwachang Song received his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering from Korea University in 1997, 1999, and 2003, respectively. He was a post-doctoral scholar at Iowa State University from 2003 to 2004. He worked as a faculty member in the School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Kunsan National University, from 2005 to 2008. Currently, he is a professor in the Department of Electrical and Information Engineering and the Department of Smart Energy System Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology. His recent research interests include optimization with uncertain parameters, system modeling, system operation and control, and renewable energy.

E-mail: hcsong@seoultech.ac.kr


Article

Original Article

International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22(2): 128-134

Published online June 25, 2022 https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Copyright © The Korean Institute of Intelligent Systems.

Security-constrained Economic Dispatch (SCED) Considering Load Level Uncertainty

BenJeMar-Hope Flores1 and Hwachang Song2

1Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea
2Department of Smart Energy System Engineering, Seoul National University of Science and Technology, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence to:Hwachang Song (hcsong@seoultech.ac.kr)

Received: September 24, 2021; Revised: September 24, 2021; Accepted: January 10, 2022

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

In power system operation, security-constrained economic dispatch (SCED) is used to provide a reference point for the next time period for each dispatchable generator, and load forecasting needs to be involved in the SCED procedure. In real-time operation, forecasting errors and the nonlinearity of the load change might cause undesirable dispatch patterns in terms of system security. This study presents an SCED that considers the uncertainty of the system load level. For this purpose, a fuzzy model was employed to express the uncertainty in the load level change, and a practical two-stage SCED solution method was adopted. In addition, to resolve the difficulty in determining the reference generation pattern from solutions using this model, a procedure is required to determine the secure upper and lower limits for the dispatchable generators as the final SCED outcome. The numerical results were obtained using a 43-bus test system to test the feasibility of the proposed method.

Keywords: Economic dispatch, Load level, Generation pattern, Security constraints, Uncertainty model

Fig 1.

Figure 1.

Fuzzy model for change in the system load level.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Fig 2.

Figure 2.

Two-stage SCED procedure and related modules.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Fig 3.

Figure 3.

Conceptual structure of the solution technique.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Fig 4.

Figure 4.

One-line diagram of the 43-bus test system.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Fig 5.

Figure 5.

One-line diagram of the 43-bus test system.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Fig 6.

Figure 6.

One-line diagram of the 43-bus test system.

The International Journal of Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Systems 2022; 22: 128-134https://doi.org/10.5391/IJFIS.2022.22.2.128

Table 1 . Simulation data for the dispatchable generators.

BusPGo (MW)PGmax (MW)PGmin (MW)Rdn/up (MW/m)IC (₩/kW)
3010020010040141.96
31527527280550.30
34527527280648.20
36527527280448.90
3721221214626.874.41
4021221214626.874.41
411321321093074.41
382582721313476.37
422582721313476.37
4325426813140.676.37

Table 2 . Dispatch results for the dispatchable generators (unit: MW).

BusUED(1)UED(2)UED(3)CED(3)
300.00.00.052.9395
310.00.00.00.0
340.00.00.00.0
360.00.00.00.0
370.00.00.00.0
400.00.00.00.0
410.00.00.00.0
38*−36.8235−33.346117.0804−0.9845
42*−36.8235−33.346117.0804−0.9845
43*−36.3529−33.307915.8392−0.9704

Table 3 . Simulation results applying the proposed SCED procedure (unit: MVA).

CaseP28–29Q28–29S28–29P29–28Q29–28S29–28Smax
UED(1)−601.321.6601.7606.03.2606.1712.5
UED(2)−611.021.3611.4615.95.3616.0712.5
UED(3)−756.010.4756.0763.847.8765.3712.5
CED(3)−705.015.1705.1711.730.9712.3712.5

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